German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Forum Index German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America
AKC Parent Club for the German Wirehaired Pointer
 
 ForumForum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
 gwpca bulletin boardGWPCA Home Page   gwpca bulletin boardBulletin Board   gwpca bulletin boardGWPCA Rescue Page 

Feet/Legs
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Forum Index -> Hunting
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Jon
Senior
Senior


Joined: 04 Apr 2006
Posts: 117

PostPosted: 03/17/08, 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With the price of fuel and fertilizer sky high, I wonder how much these farmers are really making. I hear there was corn in dryers most of the winter and that's not cheap either. I know the Soo Line ran short of grain cars again last year and grain sat piled at loading yards. Ethanol's bringing about $1.50 and current future's on corn are running $5.00. I'm looking for a big collapse in this whole thing. The cost of planting the stuff is way up and there's no market for ethanol. The losers will be the farmers that leveraged new capital investments and of course the wildlife.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
whiskerdog1
Master
Master


Joined: 01 Apr 2005
Posts: 256
Location: Rustbelt

PostPosted: 03/17/08, 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jon...
I know that wheat is at All time highs now as a result of ethanol focus. And wheat supplies & inventories are at all time lows. Less than a 2 week supply.
Seem to me some farmers may be planting more wheat this Spring.
Sorghum is the worlds biggest crop & not sure where prices are.
Id dare say the farm subsidies will continue, ethanol the focus. Just wish theyd leave strip & ditch cover for nesting birds. Its a damn shame not to.

Far as energy, you may like. A winning racing team & designers of the Frech Grand Prix, have developed a car that runs totally on air. Here it is-short vid.
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=oSwlTqaM1oA

We cant say the Alternate energy isnt available, because its a lie.
Toyota & GM developed the Toyota Rav 4 & electric motor, some cars are still on the road today. Cars runs off of solar battery, powered & placed on the roof to the garage, then to a battery cell in engine, & converted to electric. Goes 80mph & 300 miles on 1 charge.
Guess who bought the technology?
Chevron
THey Killed the Rav & the Electric motor technology.
The Dutch are now 150% self sufficient. They Export energy at profits to other nations. We can do it, Oil COs choose not to.

Tony-again, Id like to know what the farmers there are/arent doing. Just curious. Helps me to better understand farming dynamics.
_________________
Real men hunt Wire Dogs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Tony
Master
Master


Joined: 22 Oct 2002
Posts: 197
Location: Iowa

PostPosted: 03/17/08, 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't follow the farm markets very close, but I do know that corn, beans, and wheat are selling at very high prices right now. The farm land value has almost doubled in the last few years, and I doubt if we will ever see the thousands of acres of pheasant producing CRP like we had in the '90's. I was talking to a farmer the other day, and I asked him how many tractors he was going to buy. He told me that if he ordered a new John Deere combine today, he would be lucky to take delivery before next years harvest.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Chinchy
Junior
Junior


Joined: 30 Dec 2002
Posts: 33
Location: Kansas

PostPosted: 03/20/08, 8:08 am    Post subject: Feed Prices Reply with quote

My custom horse feed mix has jumped $60.00+ per ton in the last 2 months!
The price of whole oats has risen to $16.50 for bulk price, that is the highest I have ever saw oats. The elevator said oats were rising because fewer farmers were planting them, better prices & profit on corn ,wheat, beans etc.
Jon, Tony I think you both know I am a farrier,these grain prices,high gas prices,& the low value of horses has trickeled down to me,& not as many people are traveling & riding, so less business for me!
_________________
Loyd Tollett
Rock Hill Kennel
Proud Owner & Home Of
Black & White German Wirehaired Pointers
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jon
Senior
Senior


Joined: 04 Apr 2006
Posts: 117

PostPosted: 03/20/08, 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

After a lot of lean years, I have to feel happy for the farmers but there is no doubt that the wildlife is going to suffer. If the dry trend continues, at least we may see some decent spring hatches. If we get into a wet cycle, we could really see the numbers decline---bad spring and decline in habitat are a bad combo.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
whiskerdog1
Master
Master


Joined: 01 Apr 2005
Posts: 256
Location: Rustbelt

PostPosted: 03/20/08, 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Im not so sure that farmers have it made Jon..
1 Place I hunt waterfowl, owner is 94 yrs young. Said last year was his worst year in almost 80 years of farming. Was Very dry here.

Inflation is killing us.
Like the war or not, the truth is that We are printing money we dont have, borrowing it, causing more inflation..raises prices of everything...Oil, milk, bread, dogfood, eggs all commodities. As Oil goes up, so does everything, Packaging & Gas are direct derivatives. But Oil is going up as an importing costs go up, due to a weakening dollar.
Not many grasp this.

M3 is no longer reported.
We dont even know what the money supply is.
Federal Reserve is neither federal, nor a reserve, unconstiutional & is bankrupting this nation.

Expect consumer prices to go much higher.
We are in Iraq TO Stay. And lookout for more invasions soon.
Middle class is getting killed. One or 2 more bad years, and the US Farmer is done.
Now, We got slammed with rain lately, its been very wet & lots of accumulation this winter-forecast more wet, here in the Mid West. Shouldnt effect hatch as its easrly, but we'll see. Grouse & Phez here, need all the help they can get.

For curiousity sake, here is our beloved dollar, on a 2 yr chart. Ugly. Longer term is even uglier..
http://tfc-charts.w2d.com/chart/US/W
_________________
Real men hunt Wire Dogs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Tony
Master
Master


Joined: 22 Oct 2002
Posts: 197
Location: Iowa

PostPosted: 03/20/08, 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The farmers can't be hurting too much. I was just talking to my farrier this afternoon about a piece of hay ground (worthless Reed Canary Grass) renting for $1200 an acre.

Two of the farmers that I know are farming huge pieces of land with more than one family involved. They work with me at the fire department so they have health insurance and a pension, and they farm on their days when they are not on shift. Judging from their fancy pick-ups, speed boats, and snowmobiles, the farming must be treating them pretty good these days.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
whiskerdog1
Master
Master


Joined: 01 Apr 2005
Posts: 256
Location: Rustbelt

PostPosted: 03/21/08, 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony...
I think the days of the family farm in the USA, are all but gone.
Big operations most of them, else they cant survive. Corn ethanol is profitable, for now. And Farm subsidies also are huge.

" Millions of farmers have lost their livelihoods as a result of cheaper imports. "
Much of the food here in the USA, is Imported now, & growing annually.Much of the imports are not inspected.
My wife almost bought Juicy Juice for the kids & just noticed it said MADE IN CHINA, it went back on the shelf.


WASHINGTON, April 16, 2007
(AP) While the EU, Canada and Mexico still top the list of food exporters to the United States, China is coming up fast. Since 1997, the value of Chinese food imports, including commodities like wheat gluten, has more than tripled, to $2.1 billion from $644 million, according to Agriculture Department statistics. It accounts for 3.3 percent of the total food the United States buys abroad.

The U.S. imports more and more, though the increase in value is partially due to the weaker dollar. All told, the USA is expected to import a record $70 billion in agricultural products for the 12 months ending in September, according to an Agriculture Department forecast. The value of those imports will be about double the nearly $36 billion purchased overseas in 1997. Contributing to that growth are the fresh fruits and vegetables imported during the offseason, when domestic production dwindles or ends.

The Land here is worth more than 30 yrs profit to any farmer, least it was in the boom. Many sold out. My favorite deer grounds were sold to a developer but deal never was inked, Got my deer/dove grounds back, for a while anyways.
_________________
Real men hunt Wire Dogs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
StillwaterScout
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 13 Apr 2008
Posts: 3

PostPosted: 04/13/08, 11:04 am    Post subject: Paw Wax Reply with quote

Greetings fellow GWP aficiandos. I'm a new member and this is my first post. We own our first GWP (Idawire Follow Me Boys Scout). He's 8 months old and has been a great addition to the family. We get him out at least once a day and most days, twice. He's been through his first two obedience and some preliminary field training and looks to have great natural ability that I look forward to nurturing. Here's my question. Does anyone have any experience with Paw Wax? When we walk, run and/or cycle with him we try to keep him in the grass, but invariably there is some pavement time. I'm not a big fan of putting on "booties" and was wondering if anyone on this forum has had experience with paw wax and or perhaps any other tips on paw care.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dualgwp
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 19 Oct 2002
Posts: 491
Location: New Hope PA

PostPosted: 04/13/08, 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have no experience with paw wax, so can't help with that. I would recommend you let him walk, run etc on stone, concrete, sand etc to toughen his pads naturally as much as you can. If you only keep him on grass, when the time comes for him to work on the tough stuff, he may end up with some sore feet.

Most Wires have good tough pads, they should! Let em' run!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
StillwaterScout
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 13 Apr 2008
Posts: 3

PostPosted: 04/13/08, 9:41 pm    Post subject: Paw Wax Reply with quote

DualGWP-

BIG thanks for the reply and insight. I'll make sure that he get's some pavement time to toughen up his pads a bit (but not too much to wear-em raw.)Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mavrik5055
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 4

PostPosted: 04/14/08, 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not that I want to get fully involved in this argument or cause anymore feelings to get hurt but, my 5 year old has gone to SD with me every year for 10 days and in field 5-7 of those days and I have not had a problem with hair rubbing off at all, I am very anal about my dogs coat. For all practicle purposes a dogs coat is their only protection from the elements. I have however seen several GWP's that this has happened to in the field and all i can tell you is to take care of your dogs coat to the best of your ability. Some of this is in the breeding as well and your dogs coat may not be as full as other gwp's but as long as you attend to the dog and make sure he/she is not in pain it should be fine. As we all know nothing will slow these hunting dogs down. Hope this helps, everyone has different experiences, and remember, opinions are like ___________ everyone has one!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
whiskerdog1
Master
Master


Joined: 01 Apr 2005
Posts: 256
Location: Rustbelt

PostPosted: 04/23/08, 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony..& Others-this relates to the food growing you mentioned
Got Guns & Ammo?




Wall Street Journal, R.O.I.
By BRETT ARENDS

Load Up the Pantry

I don't want to alarm anybody, but maybe it's time for Americans to start stockpiling food.

No, this is not a drill.

You've seen the TV footage of food riots in parts of the developing world. Yes, they're a long way away from the U.S. But most foodstuffs operate in a global market. When the cost of wheat soars in Asia, it will do the same here.

Reality: Food prices are already rising here much faster than the returns you are likely to get from keeping your money in a bank or money-market fund. And there are very good reasons to believe prices on the shelves are about to start rising a lot faster.

"Load up the pantry," says Manu Daftary, one of Wall Street's top investors and the manager of the Quaker Strategic Growth mutual fund. "I think prices are going higher. People are too complacent. They think it isn't going to happen here. But I don't know how the food companies can absorb higher costs." (Full disclosure: I am an investor in Quaker Strategic)

Stocking up on food may not replace your long-term investments, but it may make a sensible home for some of your shorter-term cash. Do the math. If you keep your standby cash in a money-market fund you'll be lucky to get a 2.5% interest rate. Even the best one-year certificate of deposit you can find is only going to pay you about 4.1%, according to Bankrate.com. And those yields are before tax.

Meanwhile the most recent government data shows food inflation for the average American household is now running at 4.5% a year.

And some prices are rising even more quickly. The latest data show cereal prices rising by more than 8% a year. Both flour and rice are up more than 13%. Milk, cheese, bananas and even peanut butter: They're all up by more than 10%. Eggs have rocketed up 30% in a year. Ground beef prices are up 4.8% and chicken by 5.4%.

These are trends that have been in place for some time.

And if you are hoping they will pass, here's the bad news: They may actually accelerate.

The reason? The prices of many underlying raw materials have risen much more quickly still. Wheat prices, for example, have roughly tripled in the past three years.

Sooner or later, the food companies are going to have to pass those costs on. Kraft saw its raw material costs soar by about $1.25 billion last year, squeezing profit margins. The company recently warned that higher prices are here to stay. Last month the chief executive of General Mills, Kendall Powell, made a similar point.

The main reason for rising prices, of course, is the surge in demand from China and India. Hundreds of millions of people are joining the middle class each year, and that means they want to eat more and better food.

A secondary reason has been the growing demand for ethanol as a fuel additive. That's soaking up some of the corn supply.

You can't easily stock up on perishables like eggs or milk. But other products will keep. Among them: Dried pasta, rice, cereals, and cans of everything from tuna fish to fruit and vegetables. The kicker: You should also save money by buying them in bulk.

If this seems a stretch, ponder this: The emerging bull market in agricultural products is following in the footsteps of oil. A few years ago, many Americans hoped $2 gas was a temporary spike. Now it's the rosy memory of a bygone age.

The good news is that it's easier to store Cap'n Crunch or cans of Starkist in your home than it is to store lots of gasoline. Safer, too.

===============================================

Americans Hoard food as industry seeks regs
By Patrice Hill, Washington Times
April 23, 2008

Farmers and food executives appealed fruitlessly to federal officials yesterday for regulatory steps to limit speculative buying that is helping to drive food prices higher. Meanwhile, some Americans are stocking up on staples such as rice, flour and oil in anticipation of high prices and shortages spreading from overseas.

Their pleas did not find a sympathetic audience at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), where regulators said high prices are mostly the result of soaring world demand for grains combined with high fuel prices and drought-induced shortages in many countries.

The regulatory clash came amid evidence that a rash of headlines in recent weeks about food riots around the world has prompted some in the United States to stock up on staples.

Costco and other grocery stores in California reported a run on rice, which has forced them to set limits on how many sacks of rice each customer can buy. Filipinos in Canada are scooping up all the rice they can find and shipping it to relatives in the Philippines, which is suffering a severe shortage that is leaving many people hungry.

While farmers here and abroad generally are benefiting from the high prices, even they have been burned by a tidal wave of investors and speculators pouring into the futures markets for corn, wheat, rice and other commodities and who are driving up prices in a way that makes it difficult for farmers to run their businesses.

"Something is wrong," said National Farmers Union President Tom Buis, adding that the CFTC's refusal to rein in speculators will force farmers and consumers to take their case to Congress.

"It may warrant congressional intervention," he said. "The public is all too aware of the recent credit crisis on Wall Street. We don't want a lack of oversight and regulation to lead to a similar crisis in rural America."

Food economists testifying at a daylong hearing of the commission said the doubling of rice and wheat prices in the past year is a result of strong income growth in China, India and other Asian countries, where people entering the middle class are buying more food and eating more meat. Farm animals consume a substantial share of the world's grain."

I do think this is very Ominous, though Im prepared.
Bankers, Politician sell outs, Globablists & others with Dual loyalties ie Neo CONs, will be swinging from trees & in the streets.
Mark my words.
_________________
Real men hunt Wire Dogs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Tony
Master
Master


Joined: 22 Oct 2002
Posts: 197
Location: Iowa

PostPosted: 04/25/08, 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

whiskerdog1 wrote:
Tony..& Others-this relates to the food growing you mentioned

Got Guns & Ammo?


Yes, but have you seen the price of ammo lately!!!???!!! Shocked

The other day I went to Wal-Mart to get a couple of boxes of 20 gauge AA's and paid 50% more than the last time I purchased dog training ammo.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
whiskerdog1
Master
Master


Joined: 01 Apr 2005
Posts: 256
Location: Rustbelt

PostPosted: 04/26/08, 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know Tony. Ouch

I shoot my .22 more than anything now. Its So economical

WOLF makes pretty good ammo.
I shoot their 7.62 x 39 and 9mm pretty often.
Game loads didnt seem that expensive last I checked but its been awhile.. I Cant recall what I paid last, I usually buy by the case & it helps.

But my goodness the turkey loads are expensive in 3.5" Got some last week
Cost of everything is going up.
I think we are headed for hyperinflation in the next year cycle.

Hope Im wrong, but to date, Ive not been.
I own gold & Silver, bought it years ago

Stay well in Iowa
_________________
Real men hunt Wire Dogs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Forum Index -> Hunting All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Page 9 of 9

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group