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Biting

 
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Finn@point
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PostPosted: 08/27/06, 6:34 pm    Post subject: Biting Reply with quote

I know that puppies do like to bite playfully, but there are many occasions that my GWP bites when he does not like when i tell him not to do something. He'll continue to bite even for a few minutes after the reprimand...Later if I start petting him for a command that he completed successfully he will start biting somewhat harmfully.

This dog is extremely loved and given a lot of attention. We never use hitting as a consequence for his behavior.

Is this normal? If not, what can i do to rectify the situation?


P.S. he is 4 months old...
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cmmilach
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PostPosted: 08/28/06, 11:05 am    Post subject: Biting Reply with quote

Hi,

You need to stop this behavior right now! Your dog should never place his teeth on you. This is a dominace issue that needs to be stopped right now.

When he bites you for any reason, you need to grab him by the muzzle and look him in the eye & tell him "NO" along with a little shake. This should get the message across that this is not acceptable behavoir.

Good Luck.

Cathy
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dualgwp
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PostPosted: 08/29/06, 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Cathy that you have to stop this behavior, the sooner the better.

One small caution... at this age your puppy is starting to lose his baby teeth and his gums will be very sore. Grabbing by the muzzle (if his mouth is sore already) may be painful for him, and may encourage the biting habit even more. I'm always very careful of handling a puppy around the muzzle at this age.

If you can grab a lip, or his beard (if he has one) or an ear.....give him a good shake, tell him he is going to die if he grabs you again... make him believe it!!! Even getting him by the collar and take his front feet off the ground and give him a shake!

Once you have him stopped at the moment, offer him your hand. If he goes for it, give him another good correction. Do it again, and again, and again! Until he looks away and shows no interest in taking your hand into his mouth.

Another way to handle this, if your quick.... when he opens his mouth to bite, shove your hand into his mouth and at the same time grab his collar so he can't get away. You want him to NOT like the sensation of your flesh in his mouth. Or grab his bottom jaw and hang on... usually it only takes one or two of these corrections to make him believe its not a fun game to play.

We all love our dogs! Sometimes we love them too much. Remember, this is a breed with a strong personality and a penchant for wanting to do things "their" way. It's up to us to make them believe our way is better.

Whatever you do, don't put up with this now, or you will be very sorry down the road!!!!!

Good luck, persistance pays off.
Bernee
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ChumpChanger
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PostPosted: 08/30/06, 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would roll him on his back and beat the crap out of him when he bites you, shake him up a bit.....make him understand that you are the dominant pack member. It easier to get this squared away now while the pup is small. Once he/she is mature all you will have is trouble waiting to happen if you don't square it away now. Good luck.....
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dualgwp
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PostPosted: 08/30/06, 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beat the crap out of him, now that's great advice for a puppy.

Rolling Eyes
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ChumpChanger
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PostPosted: 08/30/06, 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is right...people don't like to hear it (you obviously being one of them).....you give it to that pup once or twice when that pup bites you, put him in his place,on his back and cuff him up a bit, and the trouble will stop. It is called having consequences for biting. Dogs and their social structure are all about dominance and order in the pack. Underlings in the pack are not allowed to threaten the leader or more dominant members. The pup is the bottom of the human pack, of which he/she is now a member. Too many let the dogs run the show, afraid to correct the dog for fear they will "hurt the dog's feelings"....it is such rubbish. You don't grab pups and growl at them, or bite their lips and growl. Confused That is all namby-pamby pseudo training nonsense. Get it done, and do it right....or once again because somebody follows the namby-pamby training advice, down the road we have another GWP biting someone. The GWP gets a bad rap because someone followed some "pseudo feel good training advice"....Dogs are dogs, they behave as dogs, and need to be treated as dogs. Dogs are happier when treated like dogs, they know and understand their place in the pack. That is just the way it is..... Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes
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Jon
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PostPosted: 09/01/06, 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agree with Chump Change in theory but not in the application. In the pack, a young dog like this WILL be rolled and bitten-an adult may stand over him and intimidate him until he adopts the proper posture. Beating the dog is not a good idea as it can make the dog hand shy.

This behaviour usually starts with hand biting as a young pup. I simply grab on to the dog's jaw or lips and hold on-til the dog screams to be let go. I have rarely had to do this more then 2-3 times. I never yell or even say a word.

Contrary to Chump Changes opinion-biting dogs on the top of the head or snout DOES work-it is exactly what a dominant pack member would do to a young dog. I have done it when needed for over 35 years and it works. Timing and absolute physical dominance of the pup is the key-and there is nothing namby-pamby about it when it is done properly. I have drawn blood more than once.

CC is DEFINITELY right about his conclusion-a dog that knows his place in the pack is a much more secure dog.
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dualgwp
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PostPosted: 09/01/06, 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't believe anyone believes this is a behaviour to be tolerated and it must be stopped now, just as was related to the owner.

I don't believe anyone said to molleycoddle this puppy, nor did we give ""pseudo feel good training advice".

There is a big difference in a good correction and "I would roll him on his back and beat the crap out of him". And there are many methods to corrrect bad behaviours, I choose to begin with the least physical and work my way up. This is a 4 mos. old puppy, not a year old dog. Big difference in what one needs to do.
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ChumpChanger
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PostPosted: 09/02/06, 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
This is a 4 mos. old puppy, not a year old dog. Big difference in what one needs to do.


The difference is by the time the dog is a year old, it is too big and strong, that is why getting it done right early, just saves headaches down the road. They are easier to handle when younger/smaller.....

Also this biting pups ears or lips is all nonsense IMHO. Sure that maybe what the mother would do or be done in the "dog pack"....but the pup is not in a "dog pack". The pup is now a member of the human pack, that is why we remove them from the litter. The pup must now learn to be a member of the human pack and interact with humans. I am not going to spend my life crawling on my hands and knees growling at and trying to mimick a brood bitch, or later in the dog's life trying to pin a full grown dog down and nip it, all to assert my dominance if the dog decides to challenge me. At one time or another all dogs will challenge you in various ways....I want to be on 2 feet and with my hands free. I am a man, and the dog is a member of my pack, and it has to adapt to my social interaction ways, not vice versa.

Maybe you ought to come visit and see if my dogs are "hand shy"..... Rolling Eyes
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Finn@point
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PostPosted: 09/05/06, 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really appreciate all the advice that all of you have given. I think he has gotten over the biting since i have made it clear who is boss. I didn't beat him!! I rolled him over and grabbed his lower jaw for a few seconds. He hasn't been biting since.

Thanks a lot.

Mike
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cjs180
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PostPosted: 10/03/06, 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am a bit late on this, but yes, you need to roll the dog over onto it's back and at the very least hold it there until it stops squirming around. When it gives up, this is when you know the dog realizes that YOU are pack leader and what you say goes. There is NO exception for this. Too many dogs bite people because they are not properly trained. Most of the time it comes from an owner who does not do any training with the dog at all and the dog rules the house, i.e. pack leader. This is true for all breeds of dogs, not just the GWP or DD.

Chris
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