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Importing Dogs form Germany...

 
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DogsNBirds
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Joined: 27 Mar 2005
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Location: Den Haag, The Netherlands

PostPosted: 03/27/05, 1:11 pm    Post subject: Importing Dogs form Germany... Reply with quote

Greetings from Den Haag!

A friend of mine and I are each about to purchase pups from reputable kennels in Germany. My friend is purchasing a red male and I will be buying a brown female. These dogs are from different, but champion, bloodlines and have the paperwork (in German) to validate this claim.

We are each returning to the USA after having lived abroad for several years and will be living within an hour of each other and hope to eventually breed these two for at least a couple of litters.

My question is this: How can I obtain paperwork on these pups that will be recognized by breeders and owners in the US? Although I have no aspirations to become a true 'breeder', I would like our dogs to be able to contribute to a healthy breeding pool for the good of the breed.

Thanks for any time you can give to my inquiry!
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cheerio
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PostPosted: 03/27/05, 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are all the information you need to register your 2 dogs in the AKC:

http://www.akc.org/rules/special_registry_services.cfm?page=2

Now as far as not wanting to become "a real breeder", I think perhaps you may review your idea to breed a couple of litters with these dogs. We either are a breeder or we are not. Breeding is for the purpose of improving the breed. May I kindly suggest that repeat breedings of the 2 same dogs is better left to "real breeders" that have a purpose in the repetition bringing them one step further to what they wish to achieve. Without that very specific purpose in mind, it is nothing more than "making puppies", and have nothing to do with being an ethical breeder. Because I have probably misunderstood your statement, and because I always welcome new breeders who intend to do their job with all the good sense and the passion required, if you allow me, I would like to reproduce below one of my previous post on the subject.

Breeding dogs is a wonderful adventure, but it is first and foremost a very serious and a very tough business. Causing the life of joyful little pups comes with great expense and responsibility.
Breeding dogs is not about putting two dogs together and making puppies. It is about perpetuating a breed we love and want to expend. It is about finding 2 wonderful and complementary dogs, as close to the standard as possible, and achieving life, the life of pups who will have as much as possible the qualities of Mom, and those of Dad, pups who will not have the fault of Mom, nicely compensated by Dad, nor the faults of Dad, beautifully improved by Mom. Breeding, is an exercise of genetics.
Breeding is knowing what to expect during the pregnancy of the female and also during the whelp. It is playing Doctor if and when intervention is needed, if help becomes necessary.
Breeding is spending money that you will never see again. First there is the health screening and the pre-breeding check up of the Dam. Then, there is the change of food, more expensive as the female progress in her pregnancy. There is the money for the deworming of each pup and Mom, not once, but 3 times; there is the vaccines, twice before puppies can leave for their permanent homes. There is the cost of the micro-chip for each pup, the Vet check appointment, the puppy food... and this is assuming that all goes well. A caesarian may be needed, more often that is thought; a pup may be ill, this often happens; you may have a worm infestation in the litter, or, heaven forbid, Parvo or Coronavirus which requires hospitalization of the entire litter...
Breeding is a lot of time, constantly checking on the pups the first few days, adjusting the temperature of the room, cleaning the whelping box over and over again. It is cleaning the pup's quarters 3 or 4 times a day, it is smelling Javex for weeks on ends...
Breeding is being responsible for the lives of these trusting creatures. It is checking each and every possible buyer to ensure the pup will be given a good life. It is ensuring that the dog will not be bred right and left to whatever dog or even breed passing by. It is being strong enough to say no to the person who, money in hand, insists that you sell him one of your pups. It is recognizing that the pup, from the time of his creation till the day of his death, can count on you. Are you prepared to keep any unsold pup? perhaps most of them? Are you prepared to take back any dog who, once puppyhood has passed, is no longer amusing the family, the dog who simply "did not turn out", or the dog who was not invited to move with the rest of the household?
If you have thought of it all, educated yourself, have an objective evaluation of your dog with all his qualities and all his faults. If you feel that you are prepared for the worse, then by all mean, do breed. It is one of the most enjoyable experience a dog lover can ever have. There is nothing like the goofy smile of a female who just had her first litter. There is nothing like the kisses (and the scratches) of 11 little pups climbing all over you as you sit in the middle of their pen after a long day at work. There is nothing like the smile of a happy dog who comes visiting with his family, years after he left your home. There is nothing like seeing a little glance of your dog in the eye of one of his now mature pup, years after your own dog has passed away...


Last edited by cheerio on 03/29/05, 12:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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DogsNBirds
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PostPosted: 03/27/05, 5:38 pm    Post subject: Good information and food for thought... Reply with quote

Thanks for the information and well-considered advice. I can tell by your response that my earlier message was not very well stated. Still, I do respect the integrity and experience that is evident in the re-post that you included. I wish to assure you that your thoughts and energy were not wasted and that I will heed the message(s) contained therein.

What I meant to communicate in my last post was that I am not a dog breeder by trade. I have neither specialized knowledge nor experience in this field. However, my love of gun dogs, and respect for dogs in general, compels me to inform myself prior to assuming this responsibility. As you said, it should be a serious undertaking, more than simply that of making puppies. I can imagine that many who first venture into the world of raising gun dogs do not give much thought to the areas you describe. I must admit that the reality is more complex than I can now know. After reading your post I find myself questioning my own sincerity in this endeavor. However, I do believe that we are genuine in our intent. I would be foolish to believe that I could gain the knowledge of an experienced dog breeder simply by watching a few videos or reading a couple of books. However, as these are the resources available to me at this time, this is where I shall start. I will be ordering several such resources within the next day or two.

Our family will drive in to Germany on Friday and collect our 10-week old pup. We are preparing for our June return to the USA where we hope to purchase a home on a small parcel of land suitable for raising this pup and any that might follow. Whether we choose later to breed our pup, or to not extend her bloodline, we will indeed be mindful of the topics you raised. If, after careful consideration of the required commitments and accompanying responsibilities, we do decide to breed our pup, please know that our decision will be an informed and well-considered one.

Thank you again for your thoughtful response and for making this resource available.

Goodnight from Holland!
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