German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Forum Index German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America
AKC Parent Club for the German Wirehaired Pointer
 
 ForumForum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
 gwpca bulletin boardGWPCA Home Page   gwpca bulletin boardBulletin Board   gwpca bulletin boardGWPCA Rescue Page 

A few questions from a new owner

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Forum Index -> Companion Training
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kent_sutton
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 24 Nov 2003
Posts: 5
Location: Boulder, CO

PostPosted: 11/24/03, 12:41 am    Post subject: A few questions from a new owner Reply with quote

I got my GWP about 3 months ago from the humane socitey when he was a year old. He was very skinny and had no training when i got him, in fact he didn't know how to walk up stairs or how to be around other animals. Also, they had no history on him because he was a transfer. However, he wasn't afraid of people and was EXTREMELY well mannered. Since then he has progressed so much, he knows all the basic commands (they really are smart!) and has stopped many bad habits (like chewing my shoes). However, a few days ago he figured out that he can jump the fence. I gave he a stern talking to, yet he did it again the next day. I don't think its because he's bored since he gets a run with me in the mountains or a long hike almost everyday. And on the days we don't go he gets a long trip to the dog park. I also have 3 other housemates, and pretty much at least one of us is home all the time. I figure that he just realized the 4 foot fence couldn't keep him in and now he can "hunt" all those squirrels that taunt him daily. I have a dog door and he had been allowed in and out whenever he liked. Should I just give up and build him a run, or can this habbit be broken? Our house is too small to keep him in when I'm at class and i don't want to crate him. Also, like I said before he was really skinny when i first picked him up. Since about the first 3 weeks when he put on a bunch of weight he hasn't put on any more. Right now at 1 year 3 months he is still skinny relative to other pointers and older GWPs. Is this normal for a wirehair that is very active or should he still be pretty bulky?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cmmilach
Senior
Senior


Joined: 23 Oct 2002
Posts: 113
Location: Centennial, CO

PostPosted: 11/24/03, 1:56 pm    Post subject: A few questions from a new owner Reply with quote

Hi,

Welcome to the wonderful world of wires! Unfortunately, wires like to jump fences! My male, (who is nine yrs old now), started jumping my 6 foot fence when he was 6 months old. He could do it from a sit, there is someone home all day with him & the other dogs, but he was chasing squirrels. I put a hot wire on the top of the fence, he looked at that, looked at me, & jumped onto the boat & then over the fence! I ended putting him on a 40 foot rope when he was out, he could get around the yard, but he could not make it to the fence. I only put him on the rope if someone was home.

He will be skinny for awhile. I have a 16 month old female wire who only weighs 42 lbs right now. Doc, my male, was very thin & athletic until he turned 4.

Good Luck.

Cathy M.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
Leslie Swisher
Member
Member


Joined: 21 Oct 2002
Posts: 12
Location: Albuquerque, NM

PostPosted: 11/24/03, 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why do you not want to crate him while you are in class?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ANGUS
Junior
Junior


Joined: 13 Aug 2003
Posts: 32
Location: BC Canada

PostPosted: 11/24/03, 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup they just love to show you how high they can jump...I think its a game,will you get mad if I do this?? or how bout this????. I have not even tried to put my 17month old behind a fence,,its just not worth it.lol
I have also found that you are going to have to wait to get the nice covering weight on them ,at lest till they are about 2 ,then they seem to look more proportioned...then I really see a difference when they reach about 3 yrs old.I know this cause my Dad and I raised GWP for 25 yrs.
WE had all different types and builds....but don't you just love them..
Good luck with yours...enjoy your dog.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kent_sutton
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 24 Nov 2003
Posts: 5
Location: Boulder, CO

PostPosted: 11/25/03, 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm thinking of putting him on a rope and building him a dog house. I'm never gone for more than 3 or 4 hours and the weather in Colorado is very nice most of the time. And, being a student I don't have a lot of cash to spend on the other methods of keeping him in. However, I'm worried that he will either get bored and start digging (he started one hole, but hasn't dug for a month or so). Also, what are the chances he will chew through the rope, i know he goes most everything like butter and I live next to a big road, so i can't afford to have him getting out again.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cheerio
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Posts: 285
Location: Canada

PostPosted: 11/25/03, 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chaining a dog leads to many behavioral problems often difficult to rectify. If it is only for a few hours, he would be a lot better either loose in the house or crated inside. Dogs do love their crate, it is a den, a safe heaven, somewhere where they know they will never be bothered, somewhere where nobody goes except for them. Have you noticed how dogs who do not have the chance to own their crate often ends up under the table, the chair, in the empty cabinets...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dualgwp
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 19 Oct 2002
Posts: 491
Location: New Hope PA

PostPosted: 11/25/03, 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I couldn't agree more with Cheerio! Do yourself and your dog a favor and crate train him now! By putting him on a rope you will more than likely turn him into a frustrated, barking, lunging goofball! He will chew through the rope, he will dig holes, he will bark non stop, and he will drive your neighbors and roommates crazy. And you will drive the dog crazy as well.

Crates are not cruel, they save more dogs lives by keeping them contained, calm, and doing what dogs should do when no one is home.....SLEEP!

Please reconsider..... do your dog a big favor. Give him a chance at a long and happy life.

Bernee Brawn
Justa GWP's
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
agrippa
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 26 Nov 2003
Posts: 3
Location: ontario

PostPosted: 11/26/03, 4:17 am    Post subject: fences and squirrels Reply with quote

Sounds familiar!! My GWP, who saddly passed away not long ago at the age of 11, was just the same. I think that you will have to accept that the squirrel obsession and jumping fences to get at them is so imprinted with GWPs that they will never be 100% trainable in this regard. If he is getting lots of exercise, why not keep him inside - crated or loose in the house. In my experience, a well exercised GWP is quite happy to sleep and dream hunting dreams on a cosy couch, or bed for that matter, until his beloved human returns to take him out on another madcap adventure. My GWP could outrun any greyhound right up until the end, but also loved his quiet times. When he was alone in the house I would leave the radio on to keep him company. He also loved nature TV programming, especially if there were wolf and bird sounds. Good luck with your acrobat and poet, they really are the best dogs in the world.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cheerio
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Posts: 285
Location: Canada

PostPosted: 11/26/03, 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a beautiful post Agrippa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jon P
Senior
Senior


Joined: 30 Nov 2002
Posts: 93

PostPosted: 11/26/03, 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll probably raise some hackles here, but as a general comment to this discussion and NOT referencing any of the mentioned dogs, I think we need to consider dogs that can't be left alone, which can't be quiet, which can't be contained as having a serious temperament problem. They definitely should not be bred. There are a number of owners who often regard such behavior as cute and adorable but dogs that can't be calm and patient whether in the runway, crate or house have a problem.

Over the years, I have found two keys to keeping dogs calm and happy - exercise and a regular routine (which in today's world can be difficult!). 45-60 minutes of hard exercise/day usually keeps everyone happy coupled with regular family time at night. I have recently turned down folks interested in our young bitch from Germany because I didn't see the dog getting the exercise and work she needs. The goofiness and behavioral problems often start when owners start treating dogs like people and not like dogs. They need work and a regular schedule.

I have four bitches (10 months to ten years) in the house and they gladly sleep in the kitchen after the morning run til feeding time at 5 pm. They know the routine and accept it.
_________________
Jon P
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cheerio
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 11 Mar 2003
Posts: 285
Location: Canada

PostPosted: 11/26/03, 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually quite agree with you Jon P, however, I fail to see the relation with your statement regarding breeders breeding hyper dogs.
If you do excercise your dogs and impose on them a routine, they will be content and happy. This is very true, although I also believe that it is true for human beings. I would say that it is true, even if you purchase the pup from a breeder who, for lack of excercise and/or routine, has hyper dogs.
But now, if the dog has temperament flaws past on through the game of genetics, this is an entire different matter, and I really doubt that raising his/her pup with excercise and the strictest of time table would be sufficient to make this genetically hyper pup a calm and peaceful dog.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
agrippa
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 26 Nov 2003
Posts: 3
Location: ontario

PostPosted: 11/27/03, 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree completely with the importance of schedule and exercise. However, the original post concerns an adult dog acquired from a Humane Society shelter and therefore neutered. Most of these dogs come with a mysterious history and many have been through various traumas which are going make the first stages of new ownership more than difficult. Along with training and lots of exercise comes survaillance and a lot of guess work. Consider that a working GWP can spend all day in the field without flinching. I would say that 1 hr of hard exercise per day is actually a concession on the dog's part to his owner's system. Proof in itself to the adaptabilty of the breed. I believe that even when a shelter dog adapts well to training, new schedule, new owner etc. there is always the possibility that something unexpected will set him off. The responsibilty of the owner lies with never allowing the dog to be in a situation where the unexpected reaction will be lifethreatening.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Forum Index -> Companion Training All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group