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Getting a new puppy - have a few open questions?

 
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kerily
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PostPosted: 03/14/05, 10:04 pm    Post subject: Getting a new puppy - have a few open questions? Reply with quote

Hi -

This board seems like a nice friendly helpful place. We are potentially getting a new puppy and I have a few open questions that I am seeking answers for before finalising my decision on the GWP.

#1 - stripping: how hard is it to do yourself? how often do you have to do it? can you find a groomer who can do it properly?

#2 - jumping: the dogs at the breeders all 'jumped for joy' when we came in. And by jumping I mean bounce, bounce, bounce. Is this common? Do all dogs do this? Do they jump the fence easily/often?????

#3 - barking: the breeder scared me because she says some of their dogs so bark alot and they have to use a barking collar on them. Is this common? Preventable?

#4 - health problems: what are they besides hips and elbows?

Thanks in advance for any help that you can give me. I really appreciate it Smile
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Sheamus
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PostPosted: 03/15/05, 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unfortunately, I can't give you any answers regarding GWP puppies, as we adopted ours as an adult....

I just wanted to say "congrats!" and I'm sure you will enjoy your GWP.....

We've had our guy for a month now, and he has barked maybe 5 times total.....so, either he was trained not to bark, or....he just doesn't....but, for us, barking is definitely not a problem.....

Good Luck with your GWP!
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Enjoying our adopted GWP (Sheamus) since Feb 14, 2005!

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cmmilach
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PostPosted: 03/15/05, 6:34 pm    Post subject: Getting a new puppy - have a few questions Reply with quote

Hi,

First I would like to tell you how smart you are to research the breed prior to obtaining one & realizing that you made a mistake - they are not for everyone.

#1 - stripping: how hard is it to do yourself? how often do you have to do it? can you find a groomer who can do it properly? - if you are not going to show your wire there is no need to strip their coat. If you want to do it yourself it is not too hard if you have the correct stripping knife.

#2 - jumping: the dogs at the breeders all 'jumped for joy' when we came in. And by jumping I mean bounce, bounce, bounce. Is this common? Do all dogs do this? Do they jump the fence easily/often????? - My dogs are happy to see me when I come home & I have taught them not to jump on me. As far as jumping the fence - my male dog started jumping my 6 foot fence when he was 6 months old chasing squirrels - my female has never once tried so I guess it depends on the drive your dog has.

#3 - barking: the breeder scared me because she says some of their dogs so bark alot and they have to use a barking collar on them. Is this common? Preventable? - they do tend to bark (both of mine bark at people walking down the street or if there is a cat in the yard). My male wore a bark collar for awhile & that pretty much stopped him. He was never left outside if no one was home.

#4 - health problems: what are they besides hips and elbows? - as far as health problems they are a pretty healthy breed - some do have food allergies but if you ask the breeder if any of their dogs have problems you should be able to avoid that.
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kerily
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PostPosted: 03/15/05, 7:12 pm    Post subject: Thanks! Reply with quote

thanks so much for the helpful replies. I will let you know when I make a decision....
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Trilini
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PostPosted: 03/15/05, 8:57 pm    Post subject: I've had 3 GWP Reply with quote

#1 stripping is about as hard as combing the dog. Ours really enjoy it. It's not mandatory by any means but some are wooly or uneven in their coat and look better stripped. Definitely not something to be afraid of.

#2 Jumping. None of our dogs jump on us. They all came as rescue dogs so may have been trained but one was badly abused by being kept in a cage for a winter and she's not a jumper. We have a 4 foot fence that they could jump over but don't. I've heard some will. You should be aware that these dogs need exercise and will be unhappy if they can't run. As long as they get exercise they are amazing.

#3 I wouldn't consider our GWP's barkers. Now our Jack Russell terriers are another story. One of our GWP's is very verbal, she kind of sings or sighs or groans but not loud enough to bother neighbors.

Good luck with your choice. I love this breed but remember, they need exercise and things to keep them interested.

Pat
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Deb Finstad
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PostPosted: 03/16/05, 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

#4 - health problems: what are they besides hips and elbows?

I'd add hypothyroidism to the list.
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dualgwp
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PostPosted: 03/17/05, 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can Wires jump? Aboslutely!

I've had several over the years that could clear 6 ft fences from a standstill. I had one that could go over an 8 ft with little problem. Several could jump straight up onto a ledge about 4 ft above their heads with no effort at all. Can Wires jump??????

Can Wires open gates? Absolutely. Almost every one I own have learned how to open a gate latch. It gets annoying, but I have to admire their ingenuity. When one owns this breed, they learn to have lots of clips about to put on gates.

Do Wires bark? Some do more than others. Some have a god awful high pitched "I'm being murdered" squeal......sends you running to check on them every time. Others are simply demanding, spoiled, and used to getting their own way. When you have one that barks like that, you run the risk of any youngsters learning to do it... so you may start with one screamer and end up with a batch of them.

Do Wires need grooming? Yes. All dogs need a good brushing to remove dead hair, dirt and gunk. All Wire coats need to have that dead hair taken off now and then to allow new, healthy coat to grow. Longer, heavier coats will need it more often and will need a bi-annual stripping to stay in good healthy condition. Because Wire coats don't shed out (like a Golden or Shephard or even a GSP) the dead wirey hairs and the softer undercoat needs to be removed. Fact of life if you want to own this breed.

This is such a great breed, but they have their quirks. Not everyone can deal with their personalities, and don't have the time to give them. Please remember, this is a hard going, determined working dog. Lying around the fireplace is not high on their list of activities!! They need to be excercised both physically and mentally...they need to work. And they live a long time!!!!!!!! That cute little fuzzy puppy will probably live to be 14 yrs old.

I'm glad to see people asking good hard questions.
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cheerio
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PostPosted: 03/25/05, 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would also like to add on the topic of jumping, barking and health matters.

Jumping: Well I think it is important to dissociate jumping from joy and jumping the fence. There is no doubt that a well behaved dog should not jump on people and training will take care of that quite easily. If puppy comes from a home where jumping was allowed, he will more than likely have learnt it from his observation of Mom and other dogs by the time he is ready to come to your home. If you kneel in front of him when he comes to you, as a young pup, he is likely not to jump. You can also put your hand down on the top of his head as he jumps and he will soon learn that it is not an acceptable behavior. Now, once a little bit older, if he is still jumping, more serious technics can be used, from stepping on his back foot to lifting your knee on his chest or turning him over on his back. All these methodes are successful in no time at all if applied properly. On of the methode I particularily like is the one which insist on the dog to sit in front of you when he comes to you. This can be taught as early as 8 or 10 weeks old and makes sure the dog will never jump.
If your breeder has his/her dogs in kennels, they are probably over excited when someone comes with a little bit of attention to offer. The dogs then would jump and bark. This is not to say however that once in a home sharing his life with his owners, the dog will continue to bark and jump. If he is part of the family life, he will have very little opportunity to become as excited and thus will not likely start bouncing around in great noise.

Barking: I have found the Wiredhair to be a good allert dog but not an abnoxious barker. Now dogs bred and raised in kennels are more likely to be and become barkers. One easy way to ensure that puppy will not bark for no reasons, is to teach him to bark on specific cues. When someone rings the door bell and that puppy barks, make sure he can run freely to the door. Follow him to the door asking him "what is it?". Once at the door, simply carry him, with one hand you gently hold his muzzle closed and with the other you stroke his chest while saying calmly :Thank you". Then you open the door, great the person and then put puppy down. If you do that calmly every time someone comes to your door, your dog soon will have learnt to bark to allert, and to stop once you say "thank you", or once the person has left if you are not home. I prefer the use of "thank you" rather than "That's enough" or "No"... simply because I want my dog to understand that he has done well, and that I am pleased but now, I shall take over. The other commonly used commands seem to be more negative and more of a correction.

Health: I would like to add to the list the 2 Ps: Pannus and Pano (Panosteitis).
Pannus is a autoimmune problem which affects the eyes. There is a definite genetic link.
Juvenil cataract is also in some of the lines.
Pano is a bone condition which is also known as Wandering Lameness. It affects the long bones and produces an irregular density in the calcification of the bones, forcing one of the bone to grow faster than the other parallele bone. It is in fact nothing more than growing pains but can be quiet debilitating. The good news is that it is always selflimited and that the dog always recover on his own by the time he reaches 20 months of age.
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kerily
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PostPosted: 04/07/05, 12:11 am    Post subject: Thanks to everyone! Reply with quote

Thanks to everyone for the responses. We have a beautiful new puppy, named Bogart. If I knew how to post a picture, I would do it! So far (2 weeks) he is going very well. He is very smart, sleeps through the night, is getting the hang of potty training and we started puppy kindergarten this week. Thanks again for all the advice....
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Soni
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PostPosted: 05/07/05, 5:45 am    Post subject: Congrats on the Pup Reply with quote

Just my quick two cents:

Barking: Baron rarely barks but vocalizes A LOT!. Moans, groans - mostly "happy talk". He does whine when really excited - I try to discourage the "whine" part, but my husband encourages it when he plays with him - no win for me there!

Jumping: On people - rarely and just a quick "No" is enough. Scaled a 6 foot high kennel - hasn't been left alone in one since - he is a house dog.

Gate Opening - Door Opening: Expert

Coat: I only have to strip with my fingers and it has never been work - I know I'm pretty lucky

Maybe someone can tell you how to post a pic - would love to see your pup.
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Jon
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PostPosted: 05/07/05, 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my experience, dogs bark and dance excessively for several reasons.

Dogs that don't get enough family time can become "charged" or even frantic. The breed does best when it has a routine that involves lots of family contact. For the most part they are not good "pure" kennel dogs.

Too many owners tolerate this kind of behavior. Start when they are puppies to reward and discourage certain behaviors, and you will get a better mannered dog. Some folks encourage this kind of nutsy behavior - big mistake. Encourage and then enforce calm behavior in the house and the runway.

Unfortunately, too many dogs have temperament flaws. The breed should be calm when appropriate. If you visit a kennel, appropriate barking is expected but dogs should quiet down quickly. IMO, when surveying kennels, dogs should be quiet, confident and focused. If they aren't look somewhere else. I once visited a very successful kennel in northern Germany. After greeting the owner, I got to listen to the dogs carry on for 45 minutes in their runways. Determined on the spot that these were not the kind of dogs I was interested in.

Good versatile dogs have to be collected and calm. Barking, twirling, dancing, etc don't fit the picture.
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kerily
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PostPosted: 06/17/05, 1:09 pm    Post subject: Pictures of puppy Reply with quote

Well, I finally figured out how to post pictures! He is not so little anymore, but here he is when I first got him at 13 weeks:



and here he is more recently. We absolutely love him and one thing that I have learned is GWPs are VERY VERY smart!

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